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Title Description Date Added
Force transmission at the handle New data obtained using the recently developed BioRow 4D handle force sensor allows derivation of fine details of force transmission from rower to oar: pulling angles in horizontal and vertical planes, and torque applied at the handle. This newly data allows for better understanding of Rowing Biomechanics, fine analysis of individual rowing technique and rigging specifics (say, effect of span/spread, oar pitch, etc.). 08/01/2022 View
Effect of blade rotation in the water Blade rotation in the water during the drive consumes energy and reduces the propulsive force and power within the rower-boat system. Force losses from the blade to the gate-handle system are related to the depth of the blade in the water. For the first time, we were able to estimate experimentally the losses of force/power caused by the blade rotation in the water. 06/12/2021 View
The next BioRow Webinar on Friday the 26th November 2021 The next BioRow Webinar on Rowing Biomechanics is scheduled on Friday the 26th November 2021 at noon 12.00pm BST. Topic: The newest progress in Rowing Biomechanics. The Webinar will last for 1.5-2 hours, starting with a presentation on the topic below followed by discussion between Dr.Valery Kleshnev and Prof. Volker Nolte, then final questions from the audience and discussions. We are looking forward to seeing you! 17/11/2021 View
Gearing and efficiency of blade types With further analysis of various blade types, it was found that • Shorter outboard in Fat2 makes oar gearing lighter, blade forces higher, but at the cost of lower blade velocity, so overall propulsive power and efficiency were lower. Comps have shown the highest efficiency of power transfer from the blade to the system, which could be explained by shorter length - less losses on blade rotation and lower axial forces. 01/11/2021 View
Propulsive power and blade efficiency The refined balance of propulsive forces allows accurate analysis of the power transfer from the blade to the movement of the rower-boat system, which is the key point of Rowing Biomechanics. This analysis has been applied to the data in M1x using three different blade types and shows that Comp would be 3.4s faster over 2km than Fat2, and 3.9s faster than Smooth blades. 14/10/2021 View
Refined balance of propulsive forces The determination of the fine balance of propulsive forces in the rower-boat-oar system is important for understanding the exact mechanics of force and power transmission from the blade hydrodynamic forces – to the movement of the system. The main achievement of this study was to obtain the refined balance of propulsive forces in the rower-boat-oar system, which confirms the validity of our models, accuracy of the measurements, and allows further extended studies and optimisation of rowing biomechanics. 10/09/2021 View
Analysis of Tokyo Olympics results A strong cross-tail wind allowed for quick times on Tokyo’s Sea Forest Waterway, despite fairly rough water. Radical changes were observed in the race strategy, which is now much more even. The first 500m split was the fastest in all previous regattas, but now the last section is the fastest. As before, the winners had the most even distribution of efforts during the race. The winners were among the slowest at the first 100-150m after start, but significantly faster than their competitors during the middle of the race. 02/08/2021 View
The next BioRow Webinar on Friday the 16th July 2021 The next BioRow Webinar on Rowing Biomechanics is scheduled on Friday the 16th July 2021 at noon 12.00pm BST (London, UK). Topic: Practical coaching with biomechanics in mind 05/07/2021 View
Axial force at the blade The axial blade force has been determined indirectly, as a difference between the handle and gate axial forces. A new type of force sensor was developed by BioRow, which was inbuilt into a handle of a sculling oar and can measure 4D forces applied to it. As expected, the axial force measured at the handle was significantly higher than at the gate, and the main part (max. 75N) should be related to a real axial blade force. The axial blade force can create up to a 70N braking force with two blades at oar angles 55deg, which is similar to the drag at the boat hull, so it should be minimised. 04/07/2021 View
The next BioRow Webinar The next BioRow Webinar on Rowing Biomechanics is scheduled on Friday the 4th June2021 at noon 12.00 BST (London, UK). Topic: Blade work and balance The Webinar will last for 1.5-2 hours and will consist of two of 30-40 min presentations interleaved with interactive periods for questions from the audience and discussions. We are looking forward to seeing you! 01/06/2021 View
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